Author Signing

Signing only

Author Reading: Kimbeth Wehrli Judge, THE FLIPSIDE

In The Flipside, 57-year-old Helen Clark and her husband, Steven, stumble across the body of Max Shaw. Unbeknownst to Steven, Max was Helen’s
childhood sweetheart and recent lover, and his presumed suicide plunges her into despair. When Helen begins seeing a therapist, painful recollections begin to surface, and her troubled past is slowly revealed. Kimbeth Wehrli Judge is the author of the short story collection Mothers and Others. She is the mother of three grown children and grandmother of five.Kimbeth lives with her husband in Chicago.

Event date: 
Friday, May 22, 2015 - 7:30pm
Event address: 
5233 N. Clark St.
60640-2122 Chicago
us

Author Reading: Carla Knorowski (editor) & Amy Carlson (contributor), GETTYSBURG REPLIES

For Gettysburg Replies, the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum challenged presidents, judges, historians, filmmakers, poets, actors, and others to craft 272 words of their own to celebrate Lincoln, the Gettysburg Address, and more. In it President Jimmy Carter reveals how the Gettysburg Address helped bring Egypt and Israel closer at the Camp David Peace Accords and Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor reflects on Lincoln’s dedication to the importance of civic education. Gettysburg Replies also features images of Lincoln, as well as documents and artifacts, including the first copy of the address that Lincoln wrote out after delivering it. Together, these words and images create a lasting tribute Carla Knorowski, Ph.D., is chief executive officer of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Foundation. She conceived and co-curated The Power of Words, an exhibit at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum that commemorated the 150th Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address, which featured essays compiled in this book. Amy Carlson is an actress best known for her roles as Alex Taylor on Third Watch and A.D.A. Kelly Gaffney on Law and Order: Trial by Jury. She was nominated for a Best Supporting Actress Daytime Emmy for her role as Josie Watts in Another World. An active volunteer, she helped found her neighborhood association, SPaCE, and works with the charity Hearts of Gold, supporting homeless women and children. Amy lives in New York City with her husband and two children.

Event date: 
Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 7:00pm
Event address: 
5233 N. Clark St.
60640-2122 Chicago
us

Author Reading: Leila Abdelrazaq, BADDAWI

Baddawi is a coming-of-age story about a young boy
named Ahmad struggling to find his place in the world. Raised in a
refugee camp called Baddawi in northern Lebanon, Ahmad is just one of
the many thousands of children born to Palestinians who fled their
homeland after the war. In this visually arresting graphic novel, Leila
Abdelrazaq explores her father’s childhood in the 1960s and 70s from a
boy’s perspective, as he witnesses the world crumbling around him and
attempts to carry on, forging his own path in the midst of terrible
uncertainty. Leila Abdelrazaq is a Chicago-based Palestinian artist and
organizer. She is a recent graduate of DePaul University where she
double majored in Theatre Arts and Arabic Studies. During her time at
DePaul, Leila served in her chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine
(SJP), helping to pass the DePaul Divest referendum.

Event date: 
Friday, May 15, 2015 - 7:30pm
Event address: 
5233 N. Clark St.
60640-2122 Chicago
us

Book Launch Party: PARIS, HE SAID by Christine Sneed

Please join us to celebrate the release of Christine Sneed's third book, the novel Paris, He Said, on May 7, 7:30 p.m. The novel focuses on Jayne Marks, a young woman who, eight years after college, moves to Paris to paint and live with an older Frenchman who is her benefactor and lover. Paris, He Said includes a real person as a character: the painter and School of the Art Institute painting instructor Susan Kraut, who is Jayne's mentor in the novel. Susan will be in attendance at the book release party. Refreshments will be served.

Christine Sneed's two previous books include the story collection
Portraits of a Few of the People I've Made Cry and the novel Little Known Facts. She teaches for the graduate creative writing programs at the University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University.

Event date: 
Thursday, May 7, 2015 - 7:30pm
Event address: 
5233 N. Clark St.
60640-2122 Chicago
us

Author Reading: Peter Slevin, MICHELLE OBAMA: A LIFE

Meticulously
tracing Michelle Obama’s life from her family’s history (dating back to
slavery) through the White House, Michelle
Obama: A Life
provides a portrait of a working mother, who has continually
struggled to balance her duties as a professional with those as a mother and a
wife. Readers learn about her reluctance to enter into political life and what
she has given up, personally and professionally, for Barack’s career. Slevin
also shows how Michelle has effectively carved out a role in the White House as
a denouncer of inequalities. Peter Slevin is a veteran national and
international reporter who spent a decade on the Washington Post's national staff before joining Northwestern's
Medill School of Journalism in 2010. He has written extensively about Barack
Obama's trajectory and has pursued a particular interest on the home front
during the Iraq and Afghan wars, producing pieces about soldiers and their
preparations for war, their return home, and the effect of war on their
families, communities, and public opinion.

Event date: 
Friday, April 24, 2015 - 7:30pm
Event address: 
5233 N. Clark St.
60640-2122 Chicago
us

Author Reading: Tracy K. Smith, ORDINARY LIGHT

The youngest of five children, Tracy K. Smith was raised with limitless affection and a firm belief in God by a stay-at-home mother and an engineer father. But just as Tracy is about to leave home for college, her mother is diagnosed with cancer, a condition she accepts as part of God’s plan. Ordinary Light is the story of a young woman struggling to fashion her own understanding of belief, loss, history, and what it means to be black in America. In lucid, clear prose, Smith interrogates her suburban childhood, her first collision with independence at Harvard, and her Alabama-born parents’ recollections of their own youth in the Civil Rights era. Tracy K. Smith is the author of three acclaimed
books of poetry, including most recently Life on Mars, winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize, a New York Times Notable Book, a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice, and a New Yorker, Library Journal, and Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year. A professor of creative writing at Princeton University, she lives in Princeton with her family.

Event date: 
Thursday, April 23, 2015 - 7:30pm
Event address: 
5233 N. Clark St.
60640-2122 Chicago
us

Author Reading: Brandy Liên Worrall: WHAT DOESN'T KILL US

What Doesn’t Kill Us chronicles Brandy Liên Worrall’s journey with an aggressive, rare breast cancer at the age of thirty-one. The book reflects on the parallels between her experiences with
cancer and her American father’s and Vietnamese mother’s trauma and survival during and after the Vietnam War. The book crosses borders, from rural, Amish-country Pennsylvania, where Brandy had grown up, to Vancouver, where she lived with her parents, husband, and two young children while enduring aggressive chemotherapy, radiation, and a double mastectomy. With surprising humor, the memoir also explores the enduring legacy of chemical warfare on three generations. Brandy Liên Worrall is the author of eight collections of poetry and has served as editor of numerous magazines, journals, and anthologies. She is the owner and editor of Rabbit Fool Press, a small family-owned-and-operated publishing company based in Vancouver. She holds an
MA in Asian American Studies from UCLA and an MFA in Creative Writing from the
University of British Columbia

Event date: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 7:30pm
Event address: 
5233 N. Clark St.
60640-2122 Chicago
us

Author Reading: Gene Baur, Living the Farm Sanctuary Life: The Ultimate Guide to Eating Mindfully, Living Longer & Feeling Better Every Day

Gene Baur is the cofounder and president of Farm Sanctuary, the nation's leading farm animal protection organization. Baur believes that happiness lies in aligning your beliefs with your actions. In this vegan and animal-friendly lifestyle guide, he and Gene Stone, author of Forks Over Knives, explore the transformative experience of visiting the sanctuary and its profound effects on people's lives. The book covers the basic tenets of Farm Sanctuary life—such as eating in harmony with your values, connecting with nature wherever you are, and reducing stress. It also offers readers simple ways to incorporate these principles into their lives, and includes 100 recipes selected by some of the organization's greatest fans, such as Chef AJ, Emily Deschanel, and Moby.
Coupled with heartwarming stories of the animals that Farm Sanctuary has saved over the years, as well as advice and ideas from some of the organization's biggest supporters, Living the Farm Sanctuary Life is an inspiring, practical book for readers looking to improve their whole lives and the lives of those around them—both two-legged and four.

Event date: 
Friday, April 17, 2015 - 7:30pm
Event address: 
5233 N. Clark St.
60640-2122 Chicago
us

Author Reading: Ann Packer in conversation with Rebecca Makkai

Join two acclaimed fiction writers, Ann Packer and Rebecca Makkai as they discuss Ann's long-awaited new novel, The Children’s Crusade. Following the lives of one California family over the course of five decades, The Children’s Crusade maps how a
troubled marriage impacts the adult children attempts to create successful families—and identities—of their own. Packer is the bestselling author of Songs Without Words and The Dive from Clausen’s Pier, which
received the Kate Chopin Literary Award, among other prizes and honors. She lives in San Carlos, CA. Rebecca Makkai is the author of the acclaimed novels The Hundred-Year House and The Borrower. Her work has frequently appeared in The Best American Short Stories, Best American Nonrequired Reading, Harper's,McSweeney's, Tin House, Ploughshares, and the Iowa Review, and has aired on "This
American Life." She lives outside Chicago with her husband and two daughters. Her forthcoming novel Music for Wartime will publish this summer. Women & Children First will be
hosting a reading of Rebecca’s new novel in August.

Event date: 
Wednesday, April 15, 2015 - 7:30pm
Event address: 
5233 N. Clark St.
60640-2122 Chicago
us

Author Reading: LaShonda Katrice Barnett, JAM ON THE VINE

In Jim Crow Texas, Ivoe
Williams, the precocious daughter of emancipated slaves, manages to get a degree in journalism. But no newspapers will hire her because of the color of her skin. Ivoe’s frustration drives her and her family to Kansas City, where she and her lover, Ona, launch the first female-run African-American newspaper, Jam! On the Vine. She
uses this platform to examine segregation and the prison system—often risking both her own safety and that of her loved ones. LaShonda Katrice Barnett was born in Missouri and grew up in Park Forest. She is the editor of I Got Thunder: Black Women Songwriters On Their Craft and Off the Record: Conversations with African American & Brazilian Women Musicians. Her short fiction has appeared in Guernica, the Chicago Tribune, and the New Orleans Review, among others. She received an M.A. in Women’s History from Sarah Lawrence College and a Ph.D. in American Studies from the College of William and Mary. She has taught literature and history at Columbia University, Hunter College, and Brown University.

Event date: 
Tuesday, April 14, 2015 - 7:00pm
Event address: 
5233 N. Clark St.
60640-2122 Chicago
us

Author Reading: Martha Holstein Women in Late Life: Critical Perspectives on Gender and Age

Contemporary old age is fraught with contradiction and complexity—women portrayed either as incompetent and cuddly grandmothers or as young women trapped in old bodies. Women in Late Life explores the thorny issues related to gender and aging, including cultural expectations, body image, ageism, chronic illness, threats to Social Security, and the challenges of a long-term care system that disadvantages women. Teaching, writing, advocating and training about aging for the past forty years, Martha Holstein is the former associate director of the American Society on Aging and has published widely in academic journals and books. She is also the co-author of the recent work, Ethics, Aging, and Society: The Critical Turn and the co-editor of several books, including Ethics in Community-Based Elder Care.

Event date: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2015 - 7:30pm
Event address: 
5233 N. Clark St.
60640-2122 Chicago
us

DARING FICTION BY INDIE AUTHORS, featuring Halle Butler and Sarah Gerard

Join us for a reading, signing, and conversation with
Halle Butler and Sarah Gerard. The evening will be
moderated by Jacob Knabb, Senior Editor at Curbside Splendor Publishing

Halle Butler lives in Chicago. Jillian is her first book.

Sarah Gerard is the author of the novel Binary Star and the forthcoming
chapbook BFF. Her short works have appeared in The New York Times, The
Paris Review Daily, Joyland, The Brooklyn Rail, and other journals.

Refreshments will be served.

Event date: 
Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 7:30pm
Event address: 
5233 N. Clark St.
60640-2122 Chicago
us

Writing Lives: Books Beyond the Prison Bars, featuring authors Maya Schenwar & Crystal Laura

Co-sponsored by Chicago Books to Women in Prison and the Chicago
chapter of Black and Pink

 

Join an interactive book
discussion with Crystal Laura (Being Bad: My Baby Brother and the
School-to-Prison Pipeline
) and Maya Schenwar (Locked Down, Locked Out:
Why Prison Doesn't Work and How We Can Do Better
). The authors will discuss
the school-to-prison pipeline, the social forces that lead to incarceration,
the way prison breaks down connections between people, and the impact of prison
on families--including their own. They'll also touch on the crucial role that
books play for people in prison. Maya Schenwar is the editor-in-chief of
Truthout. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, the Guardian,
Salon, the Nation, Mother Jones, and other publications.
Maya is the recipient of the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Chi
Award and a Lannan Residency Fellowship for her writing on the impact of prison
on families and communities. Crystal Laura is an assistant professor of
educational leadership and co-director of the Center for Urban Research and
Education at Chicago State University and a volunteer teacher at St. Leonard's
Adult High School for formerly incarcerated men and women. Among her
publications are Being Bad: My Baby Brother and the School-to-Prison
Pipeline
and Diving In: Bill Ayers and the Art of Teaching into the
Contradiction
(co-edited with Isabel Nunez and Rick Ayers). By day, she explores
teacher education and leadership preparation for learning in the context of
social justice with the goal of training school professionals to recognize,
understand, and address the school-to-prison pipeline. During the second shift,
she co-parents two marvelous boys who give her work in the field of education
particular urgency. Refreshments will be served.

Event date: 
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 - 7:30pm
Event address: 
5233 N. Clark St.
60640-2122 Chicago
us

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